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Holy Confucian Analects
   Texts 1 - 41
   Texts 42 - 82
   Texts 83 - 123
   Texts 124 - 164
   Texts 165 - 205
   Texts 206 - 246
   Texts 247 - 287
   Texts 288 - 328
   Texts 329 - 369
   Texts 370 - 410
   Texts 411 - 451
   Texts 452 - 492
   Texts 493 - 533
   Texts 534 - 574
   Texts 575 - 615
   Texts 616 - 656
   Texts 657 - 697
   Texts 698 - 738
   Texts 739 - 779
   Texts 780 - 851
Holy Mencius
   
Chapter 1
   
Chapter 2
   
Chapter 3
   
Chapter 4
   
Chapter 5
   
Chapter 6
   
Chapter 7
   
Chapter 8
   
Chapter 9
   
Chapter 10
   
Chapter 11
   
Chapter 12
   
Chapter 13
   
Chapter 14
   
Chapter 15
   
Chapter 16
   
Chapter 17
   
Chapter 18
   
Chapter 19
   
Chapter 20
   
Chapter 21
   
Chapter 22
   
Chapter 23
   
Chapter 24
   
Chapter 25
   
Chapter 26
   
Chapter 27
   
Chapter 28
The Doctrine of the Mean
The Great Learning

 

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Home : Confucianism : Holy Confucian Analects - Texts 575 - 615
Holy Confucian Analects - Texts 575 - 615

575
Tsze-lu asked what constituted a COMPLETE man. The Master said, "Suppose a man with the knowledge of Tsang Wu-chung, the freedom from covetousness of Kung-ch'o, the bravery of Chwang of Pien, and the varied talents of Zan Ch'iu; add to these the accomplishments of the rules of propriety and music;-such a one might be reckoned a COMPLETE man."

576
He then added, "But what is the necessity for a complete man of the present day to have all these things? The man, who in the view of gain, thinks of righteousness; who in the view of danger is prepared to give up his life; and who does not forget an old agreement however far back it extends:-such a man may be reckoned a COMPLETE man."

577
The Master asked Kung-ming Chia about Kung-shu Wan, saying, "Is it true that your master speaks not, laughs not, and takes not?"

578
Kung-ming Chia replied, "This has arisen from the reporters going beyond the truth.-My master speaks when it is the time to speak, and so men do not get tired of his speaking. He laughs when there is occasion to be joyful, and so men do not get tired of his laughing. He takes when it is consistent with righteousness to do so, and so men do not get tired of his taking." The Master said, "So! But is it so with him?"

579
The Master said, "Tsang Wu-chung, keeping possession of Fang, asked of the duke of Lu to appoint a successor to him in his family. Although it may be said that he was not using force with his sovereign, I believe he was."

580
The Master said, "The duke Wan of Tsin was crafty and not upright. The duke Hwan of Ch'i was upright and not crafty."

581
Tsze-lu said, "The Duke Hwan caused his brother Chiu to be killed, when Shao Hu died, with his master, but Kwan Chung did not die. May not I say that he was wanting in virtue?"

582
The Master said, "The Duke Hwan assembled all the princes together, and that not with weapons of war and chariots:-it was all through the influence of Kwan Chung. Whose beneficence was like his? Whose beneficence was like his?"

583
Tsze-kung said, "Kwan Chung, I apprehend was wanting in virtue. When the Duke Hwan caused his brother Chiu to be killed, Kwan Chung was not able to die with him. Moreover, he became prime minister to Hwan."

584
The Master said, "Kwan Chung acted as prime minister to the Duke Hwan made him leader of all the princes, and united and rectified the whole kingdom. Down to the present day, the people enjoy the gifts which he conferred. But for Kwan Chung, we should now be wearing our hair unbound, and the lappets of our coats buttoning on the left side.

585
"Will you require from him the small fidelity of common men and common women, who would commit suicide in a stream or ditch, no one knowing anything about them?"

586
The great officer, Hsien, who had been family minister to Kung-shu Wan, ascended to the prince's court in company with Wan.

587
The Master, having heard of it, said, "He deserved to be considered WAN (the accomplished)."

588
The Master was speaking about the unprincipled course of the duke Ling of Weil when Ch'i K'ang said, "Since he is of such a character, how is it he does not lose his state?"

589
Confucius said, "The Chung-shu Yu has the superintendence of his guests and of strangers; the litanist, T'o, has the management of his ancestral temple; and Wang-sun Chia has the direction of the army and forces:-with such officers as these, how should he lose his state?"

590
The Master said, "He who speaks without modesty will find it difficult to make his words good."

591
Chan Ch'ang murdered the Duke Chien of Ch'i.

592
Confucius bathed, went to court and informed the Duke Ai, saying, "Chan Hang has slain his sovereign. I beg that you will undertake to punish him."

593
The duke said, "Inform the chiefs of the three families of it."

594
Confucius retired, and said, "Following in the rear of the great officers, I did not dare not to represent such a matter, and my prince says, "Inform the chiefs of the three families of it."

595
He went to the chiefs, and informed them, but they would not act. Confucius then said, "Following in the rear of the great officers, I did not dare not to represent such a matter."

596
Tsze-lu asked how a ruler should be served. The Master said, "Do not impose on him, and, moreover, withstand him to his face."

597
The Master said, "The progress of the superior man is upwards; the progress of the mean man is downwards."

598
The Master said, "In ancient times, men learned with a view to their own improvement. Nowadays, men learn with a view to the approbation of others."

599
Chu Po-yu sent a messenger with friendly inquiries to Confucius.

600
Confucius sat with him, and questioned him. "What," said he! "is your master engaged in?" The messenger replied, "My master is anxious to make his faults few, but he has not yet succeeded." He then went out, and the Master said, "A messenger indeed! A messenger indeed!"

601
The Master said, "He who is not in any particular office has nothing to do with plans for the administration of its duties."

602
The philosopher Tsang said, "The superior man, in his thoughts, does not go out of his place."

603
The Master said, "The superior man is modest in his speech, but exceeds in his actions."

604
The Master said, "The way of the superior man is threefold, but I am not equal to it. Virtuous, he is free from anxieties; wise, he is free from perplexities; bold, he is free from fear.

605
Tsze-kung said, "Master, that is what you yourself say."

606
Tsze-kung was in the habit of comparing men together. The Master said, "Tsze must have reached a high pitch of excellence! Now, I have not leisure for this."

607
The Master said, "I will not be concerned at men's not knowing me; I will be concerned at my own want of ability."

608
The Master said, "He who does not anticipate attempts to deceive him, nor think beforehand of his not being believed, and yet apprehends these things readily when they occur;-is he not a man of superior worth?"

609
Wei-shang Mau said to Confucius, "Ch'iu, how is it that you keep roosting about? Is it not that you are an insinuating talker?

610
Confucius said, "I do not dare to play the part of such a talker, but I hate obstinacy."

611
The Master said, "A horse is called a ch'i, not because of its strength, but because of its other good qualities."

612
Some one said, "What do you say concerning the principle that injury should be recompensed with kindness?"

613
The Master said, "With what then will you recompense kindness?"

614
"Recompense injury with justice, and recompense kindness with kindness."

615
The Master said, "Alas! there is no one that knows me."



 

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