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Holy Confucian Analects
   Texts 1 - 41
   Texts 42 - 82
   Texts 83 - 123
   Texts 124 - 164
   Texts 165 - 205
   Texts 206 - 246
   Texts 247 - 287
   Texts 288 - 328
   Texts 329 - 369
   Texts 370 - 410
   Texts 411 - 451
   Texts 452 - 492
   Texts 493 - 533
   Texts 534 - 574
   Texts 575 - 615
   Texts 616 - 656
   Texts 657 - 697
   Texts 698 - 738
   Texts 739 - 779
   Texts 780 - 851
Holy Mencius
   
Chapter 1
   
Chapter 2
   
Chapter 3
   
Chapter 4
   
Chapter 5
   
Chapter 6
   
Chapter 7
   
Chapter 8
   
Chapter 9
   
Chapter 10
   
Chapter 11
   
Chapter 12
   
Chapter 13
   
Chapter 14
   
Chapter 15
   
Chapter 16
   
Chapter 17
   
Chapter 18
   
Chapter 19
   
Chapter 20
   
Chapter 21
   
Chapter 22
   
Chapter 23
   
Chapter 24
   
Chapter 25
   
Chapter 26
   
Chapter 27
   
Chapter 28
The Doctrine of the Mean
The Great Learning

 

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Home : Confucianism : Holy Confucian Analects - Texts 493 - 533
Holy Confucian Analects - Texts 493 - 533

493
The Master said, "That is notoriety, not distinction.

494
"Now the man of distinction is solid and straightforward, and loves righteousness. He examines people's words, and looks at their countenances. He is anxious to humble himself to others. Such a man will be distinguished in the country; he will be distinguished in his clan.

495
"As to the man of notoriety, he assumes the appearance of virtue, but his actions are opposed to it, and he rests in this character without any doubts about himself. Such a man will be heard of in the country; he will be heard of in the clan."

496
Fan Ch'ih rambling with the Master under the trees about the rain altars, said, "I venture to ask how to exalt virtue, to correct cherished evil, and to discover delusions."

497
The Master said, "Truly a good question!

498
"If doing what is to be done be made the first business, and success a secondary consideration:-is not this the way to exalt virtue? To assail one's own wickedness and not assail that of others;-is not this the way to correct cherished evil? For a morning's anger to disregard one's own life, and involve that of his parents;-is not this a case of delusion?"

499
Fan Ch'ih asked about benevolence. The Master said, "It is to love all men." He asked about knowledge. The Master said, "It is to know all men."

500
Fan Ch'ih did not immediately understand these answers.

501
The Master said, "Employ the upright and put aside all the crooked; in this way the crooked can be made to be upright."

502
Fan Ch'ih retired, and, seeing Tsze-hsia, he said to him, "A Little while ago, I had an interview with our Master, and asked him about knowledge. He said, 'Employ the upright, and put aside all the crooked;-in this way, the crooked will be made to be upright.' What did he mean?"

503
Tsze-hsia said, "Truly rich is his saying!

504
"Shun, being in possession of the kingdom, selected from among all the people, and employed Kai-yao-on which all who were devoid of virtue disappeared. T'ang, being in possession of the kingdom, selected from among all the people, and employed I Yin-and an who were devoid of virtue disappeared."

505
Tsze-kung asked about friendship. The Master said, "Faithfully admonish your friend, and skillfully lead him on. If you find him impracticable, stop. Do not disgrace yourself."

506
The philosopher Tsang said, "The superior man on grounds of culture meets with his friends, and by friendship helps his virtue."

507
Tsze-lu asked about government. The Master said, "Go before the people with your example, and be laborious in their affairs."

508
He requested further instruction, and was answered, "Be not weary in these things."

509
Chung-kung, being chief minister to the head of the Chi family, asked about government. The Master said, "Employ first the services of your various officers, pardon small faults, and raise to office men of virtue and talents."

510
Chung-kung said, "How shall I know the men of virtue and talent, so that I may raise them to office?" He was answered, "Raise to office those whom you know. As to those whom you do not know, will others neglect them?"

511
Tsze-lu said, "The ruler of Wei has been waiting for you, in order with you to administer the government. What will you consider the first thing to be done?"

512
The Master replied, "What is necessary is to rectify names."

513
"So! indeed!" said Tsze-lu. "You are wide of the mark! Why must there be such rectification?"

514
The Master said, "How uncultivated you are, Yu! A superior man, in regard to what he does not know, shows a cautious reserve.

515
"If names be not correct, language is not in accordance with the truth of things. If language be not in accordance with the truth of things, affairs cannot be carried on to success.

516
"When affairs cannot be carried on to success, proprieties and music do not flourish. When proprieties and music do not flourish, punishments will not be properly awarded. When punishments are not properly awarded, the people do not know how to move hand or foot.

517
"Therefore a superior man considers it necessary that the names he uses may be spoken appropriately, and also that what he speaks may be carried out appropriately. What the superior man requires is just that in his words there may be nothing incorrect."

518
Fan Ch'ih requested to be taught husbandry. The Master said, "I am not so good for that as an old husbandman." He requested also to be taught gardening, and was answered, "I am not so good for that as an old gardener."

519
Fan Ch'ih having gone out, the Master said, "A small man, indeed, is Fan Hsu! If a superior man love propriety, the people will not dare not to be reverent. If he love righteousness, the people will not dare not to submit to his example. If he love good faith, the people will not dare not to be sincere. Now, when these things obtain, the people from all quarters will come to him, bearing their children on their backs; what need has he of a knowledge of husbandry?"

520
The Master said, "Though a man may be able to recite the three hundred odes, yet if, when intrusted with a governmental charge, he knows not how to act, or if, when sent to any quarter on a mission, he cannot give his replies unassisted, notwithstanding the extent of his learning, of what practical use is it?"

521
The Master said, "When a prince's personal conduct is correct, his government is effective without the issuing of orders. If his personal conduct is not correct, he may issue orders, but they will not be followed."

522
The Master said, "The governments of Lu and Wei are brothers."

523
The Master said of Ching, a scion of the ducal family of Wei, that he knew the economy of a family well. When he began to have means, he said, "Ha! here is a collection-!" When they were a little increased, he said, "Ha! this is complete!" When he had become rich, he said, "Ha! this is admirable!"

524
When the Master went to Weil Zan Yu acted as driver of his carriage.

525
The Master observed, "How numerous are the people!"

526
Yu said, "Since they are thus numerous, what more shall be done for them?" "Enrich them, was the reply.

527
"And when they have been enriched, what more shall be done?" The Master said, "Teach them."

528
The Master said, "If there were any of the princes who would employ me, in the course of twelve months, I should have done something considerable. In three years, the government would be perfected."

529
The Master said, "'If good men were to govern a country in succession for a hundred years, they would be able to transform the violently bad, and dispense with capital punishments.' True indeed is this saying!"

530
The Master said, "If a truly royal ruler were to arise, it would stir require a generation, and then virtue would prevail."

531
The Master said, "If a minister make his own conduct correct, what difficulty will he have in assisting in government? If he cannot rectify himself, what has he to do with rectifying others?"

532
The disciple Zan returning from the court, the Master said to him, "How are you so late?" He replied, "We had government business." The Master said, "It must have been family affairs. If there had been government business, though I am not now in office, I should have been consulted about it."

533
The Duke Ting asked whether there was a single sentence which could make a country prosperous. Confucius replied, "Such an effect cannot be expected from one sentence.



 

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